Electro-Wash Tri-V
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Electro-Wash Tri-V Degreaser

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Electro-Wash Tri-V Degreaser

The Ultimate n-Propyl (nPB) Replacement

Electro-Wash Tri-V Precision Cleaner is a nonflammable cleaner that quickly removes flux, grease, oils, dirt, dust, and other contaminants from electronic components and assemblies. It removes all types of oil and grease while evaporating quickly and leaving no residues. Tri-V nPB replacement chemistry is an innovative chemistry that does not contain n-propyl bromide, TCE, hazardous air pollutants or ozone depleting compounds.

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Features & Benefits

  • Powerful cleaning agent to remove flux, oils, dirt, grease, dust, and other contaminants, one cleaner for electronics cleaning
  • Nonflammable, can be used on energized equipment
  • Penetrates to clean hard to reach areas
  • Evaporates quickly and leaves no residues, minimizes down time
  • Does not contain n-propyl bromide, trichloroethylene, or perchloroethylene
  • Stabilized for metals such as aluminum, magnesium, titanium, and brass
  • Noncorrosive, safe for sensitive metals
  • NSF Registered - Nonfood Compounds / Code K1 and K2

Applications

  • Printed circuit boards
  • Relays and switches
  • Transformers
  • Electro-mechanical devices
  • Electric motors and generators
  • Electronic controllers
  • Circuit breakers

Vapor Degreaser Setting Guidelines

  • Boiling point – 118°F / 48°C
  • Boil sump temp set – 127°F / 53°C  
  • High solvent temp set – 136°F / 58°C
  • Refrigerant high temp set – 109°F / 43°C

Shipping Name - Cleaning Compound N.O.I. 


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Part # Size Units Per Case
VVV1614

12 oz / 340 g aerosol

12 containers per case
VVV114

1 gal / 3.7 L container

1 container per case
VVV514

5 gal / 19 L container

1 container per case
VVV5514

53 gal / 200 L drum

1 drum
Order from an authorized distributor

FAQ's

How can you reduce chemical exposure?

Every organization using hazardous chemicals within their facility has the responsibility to equip their facility and personnel to maintain exposure levels below the TLV. Personal monitoring badges can be used to measure exposure of a specific material. Then, depending on the threshold limit and the application, exposure can be controlled with PPE like masks, face shields, respirators, and even coveralls. If they don’t reduce exposure below the recommended limit, you will need to consider a special ventilation hood or even containment booth. As you can see, as the exposure limit gets down to a certain level, the equipment required to safely use the solvent can get impractical. At that point, your best option is to consider a safer alternative.

How do you know the safe exposure limit of a degreaser, contact cleaner, or flux remover?

The personal hazard associated with a solvent is often defined using Threshold Limit Value (TLV), which is the recommended average exposure in an 8-hour day, 40 hour work week. The lower the TLV of a particular substance, the less a worker can be exposed to without harmful effects. TLV is stated on the SDS of chemical products, in additional to recommended personal protection equipment (or PPE). The threshold limit value of a solvent is generally set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). The unit of measure is Parts Per Million (PPM). 

How do you use an aerosol cleaner?

Hold object to be cleaned in vertical position. Pull trigger gently to control solvent flow rate. Scrub with brush from top to bottom, allowing the liquid to flush away contaminants. 

What spigot or spout do you recommend for your metal 5-gallon and 55-gallon drums?

Metal 5-gallon and 55-gallon drums are compatible with standard 3/4" and 2" spouts. Ideally use 3/4" for 5-gallon, 2" for 55-gallon.

How do I properly dispose of an aerosol can after it is empty?

It may be different state-by-state, so contact your state environmental agency for regional specific regulations. For a general guideline, here is the process according to EPA hazardous waste regulations 40CFR. The can has to be brought to or approach atmospheric pressure to render the can empty. Puncturing is not required, only that it “approach atmospheric pressure”, i.e. empty the can contents until it’s no longer pressurized. This insures that as much contents as is reasonably possible are out of the can. It is then considered “RCRA-empty”. At that point it can be handled as any other waste metal container, generally as scrap metal under the recycling rules. Note that the can is still considered a solid waste at this point (not necessarily hazardous waste).

Is there something I can do with the extension tube (straw) so it doesn’t get lost?

The red cap on Chemtronics aerosol products like flux removers, degreasers, and Freeze-It Freeze Spray has a notch on the top. That is engineered for the straw to snap in and hold into place so you don’t loose it. The aerosol trigger sprayers that are common on dusters, freeze sprays, and flux removers, have two ways to store the straw when not in use. The hole at the back of the body of the sprayer is just the right size for the straw to slide into place for storage. The slot below the trigger is also the right size for the straw to snap into place, which also has the advantage of locking the trigger.

Are Tri-V cleaners good replacements for n-propyl bromide (nPB)?

Yes, Tri-V high performance solvent cleaners are nonflammable, powerful cleaners like nPB, safer than nPB, and are also economically priced.

How do I figure out the shelf life of a product?

The shelf life of a product can be found on either the technical data sheet (TDS), available on the product page, or by looking on the certificate on conformance (COC). The COC can be downloaded by going to https://www.chemtronics.com/coc. Once you have the shelf life, you will need to add it to the manufacture date for a use-by date. The manufacture date can be identified by the batch number. The batch code used on most of our products are manufacture dates in the Julian Date format. The format is YYDDD, where YY = year, DDD = day. For example, 19200 translates to the 200th day of 2019, or July 19, 2019. This webpage explains and provides charts to help interpret our batch numbers: https://www.chemtronics.com/batch-codes.

Should I use gloves when using a degreaser?

Yes, it is a good idea to use gloves when degreasing. The solvents used in degreasers do a great job at breaking down greases and oils, which also happen to exist in health skin. If your hands are exposed to a degreasing solvent for enough time, oils will be drawn from your skin leading to “defattening”. Your skin will become very dry and you could eventually develop dermatitis, which looks more like a rash. In addition, some solvents like N-Propyl Bromide (nPB), Trichloroethylene (TCE) and Perchloroethylene (Perc) are highly toxic, so can be absorbed through the skin and cause issues like cancer, or impact liver or kidney function. Please wear gloves and other PPE as required.

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